Food Rules by Michael Pollan: Rule #39 – Eat all the junk food you want….

“Eat all the junk food you want as long as you cook it yourself.” – Michael Pollan

Junk foods are hard work.  So, if you make yourself make your own junk food, chances are you won’t be doing it as much.  In addition to that, it will be fresher and have less preservatives.  It’s a win-win – delicious sweet, salty, fried goodness and less junk food in your diet.

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Food Rules by Michael Pollan: Rule #10 – Avoid Foods That are Pretending to be Something They Are Not

Anything that is made up of artificial ingredients to appear to be another food are generally bad for you.  The best example of this may be margarine.  And artificial sweeteners.  And artificial flavors or flavor-enhancers (i.e. MSG – monosodium glutamate).  And fake meats.  And fake cheese.  Etc.

Don’t eat this bad stuff, and find a local farmer/rancher where you can buy REAL FOOD!

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Food Rules by Michael Pollan: Rule #31 – Eat Wild Foods When You Can

This is interesting – wild foods often have a greater amount of phytochemicals (super-good nutrients for your body and immune system) than “domestic” foods lack.  This is because theose wild plants have to defend themselves in their environment (against pests, weather, etc.).

So when foods grow in the wild, you are getting the heartiest of the heartiest.  Modern agriculture (often using inputs like chemical fertilizers and pesticides) cannot compete with nature.

In addition to this, domestic and modern breeds of plants have been bred for greater shelf-life, meaning that the plants that keep the longest also have the lowest levels of omega-3 fatty acids (the super-good fats for your brain and skin).  Wild game is good for you too, and again has healthier fats versus conventionally-raised meat.

So, when given the opportunity – go wild!

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Food Rules by Michael Pollan: Rule #30 – Eat well-grown food from healthy soil

Soil is the building block of any type of plant growing in it.  Yes, there is even research to support such a claim – soils rich in organic matter grow food that is more nutritious.

That means, not only is it important to eat healthy foods (i.e. plants), but it is equally important that those plants have been grown in healthy soils.  The best way to do this is to know your farmer/producer and learn about their methods with their land.  You can also grow your own food.

“Organic” is good and “local” is good – but in both cases you should become familiar with the producers and their use of the land/soil.

And if you are looking for products and services that may help you, keep your eyes on our FOOD section.

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Food Rules By Michael Pollan: Rule #18 – Don't ingest foods made in places where everyone is required to wear a surgical cap.

Simple enough.  Find foods that have been prepared in local restaurants, or even better yet, by YOU!  Most processed foods are made in high-tech facilities with machinery and product flying around (watch “How It’s Made” sometime), and this is normally an indication that this food has been heavily processed.

Go to a local farmers’ market, join a CSA, support local producers, and try to eat foods that have been prepared by human beings versus machines.

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Food Rules by Michael Pollan: Rule #25 – Eat Your Colors

There is good reason to want a diet with a lot of colors in it (and NO not crazy artificial colors that have come from dyes), the reason is that those colors are actually indicative of the phytochemicals that they contain.  Phytochemicals are good for you!

Join a CSA (Community-Supported-Agriculture), find a farmers’ market, and plant a garden!  AND EAT YOUR COLORS!

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Food Rules by Michael Pollan: Rule #13 Eat Only Foods that will Eventually Rot

Have you ever seen the picture of the Happy Meal after one year of sitting on a shelf?  Well, it turns out that not too much had changed, in other words, most of that stuff in the food was NOT FOOD, but preservatives.

Food rotting or decomposing, because of bacteria or fungi, is a natural process – it is just the way our eco-systems work.  Food rotting is a sure sign that the food you have is natural, healthful, and WHOLE food, or food that is good for you.

So, when you go shopping, avoid the middle aisles, typically where “most of the immortal foodlike substances in the supermarket are found”(Pollan, 2009).

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Food Rules by Michael Pollan: Rule #8 = Avoid Food Products that Make Health Claims

Now THIS is great advice.  If a product has a marketing budget to accompany it, then it is probably not very good for you.

Not always, of course, just something to keep in mind for when your purchase fresh fruits, vegetables, and grains, PARTICULARLY from local vendors.  These folks usually do not have a real large marketing budget, but that just doesn’t mean that they aren’t good for you.  As Pollan said, don’t “take the silence of the yams as a sign they have nothing valuable to say about your health”(2009).

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Food Rules By Michael Pollan – Rule #1, Eat Food

Michael Pollan, a tremendous journalist and author, has wrote several books concerning our food supply and connection or disconnection from such. Omnivore’s Dilemma went through the process of seeking and consuming food and eloquently showed the reader about our choices and how we may be able to make better ones if we were to become more “connected” with what we are eating.

We will now be going through Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual, which is wonderfully simple, a quick read, and something that really puts the “meat on the bones” for making good food choices.

Rule #1 = Eat Food: The substances that we call food today are probably not worthy of being called actual food.   Pollan says they are “edible foodlike substances” (2009).

Look at the label of what you are purchasing – if there are more than about 6 ingredients, consider yourself eating foodlike substances, WHICH ARE NOT REALLY FOOD, and not very good for you.  Also, if you cannot pronounce the word that is an ingredient, or if it sounds like something that could be dangerous if ingested, don’t eat it either (i.e. Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate (PGPR)E476).

Pollan, M. (2009). Food Rules – An Eater’s Manual. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Atlas Shrugged & Culture of Corruption, Part 1

Could a small business owner find solace in prophecy and watch-dog journalism?

Originally I went to Barnes & Noble to pick up the book Democracy, The God That Failed by Hans-Hermann Hoppe.  I just happen to see Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, and picked it up.  Since they were out of my original choice, the latter was my purchase, and I was off to start the thickest book that I have read in, I think, all my life.

This isn’t a book review in the “normal” modus operandi of book reviews.  Instead, this is a column dedicated to looking at books, passages, research, and journalism, to put together some pieces of what I see as the falling and/or rising of systems in place.  Economic systems, political systems, social systems, justice systems, etc.

If we can take the massive amounts of information available to us, look at it with un-biased understanding of how it affects us, and then decide upon the actions that need to take place and do something, then we have succeeded as members of this system that we call a society.  And although that is a complex process that has gone on for hundred, thousands, or maybe millions of years, it is something that we consistently revisit as human beings.

CREATIVE DESIGN FROM BROOKLYN

Big or small, we’ve got a solution when you need it. Our advanced service and support tools provide step-by-stepinstructions without being put on hold or waiting in line.